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varifleman
07-21-2008, 12:35 PM
I've attached several photos of my Gasser Model 1870 11mm revolver and would like any comments on the various markings on the pistol, especially the two markings on the cylinder and right side of barrel just forward of the cylinder. Left side of pistol has legends L Gasser patent Wien Ottakring 157732 Gussstahl. Below cylinder L.G. Hanging apple pierced by arrow, Schutzmarke. All numbers match. Also, does anybody known of a source for a some ammo for this pistol? Thanks, George

Jan C Still
07-21-2008, 02:08 PM
George
I know nothing about these pistols, however I found a little information in Adameks' Pistols of World War I.
This is the Gasser Model 1870 that was adapted by the Austro-Hungarian Cavalry. Its caliber is 11 mm Gasser, about 200,000 were manufactured and only 25,000 were procured by the military.
The LG apple on the lower left frame is the Gasser trademark.
Jan

Olefogey
07-22-2008, 03:58 PM
George,

I would be careful making cartridges for this pistol since Gussstahl means CAST steel!!.
I don't know the dimensions of your cylinder, but if it is like the Montenegrin revolver, I understand cases can be made out of modified 45 - 70 brass using a .445 dia. lead bullet of 282 - 313 grains. You should slug the barrel to come up with a bore diameter. If a true 11mm, You could use .429 dia lead bullets and possibly shorter 44 mag cases. Black powder would be the choice!! Cartridges are in the collector realm, so you should be prepared to experiment!! Hope this helps a little.

Dave

Heinrich
07-23-2008, 05:32 AM
George,
your revolver is the model 1870/74 indicated by the word "Gussstahl". The previous
model 1870 was made from cast iron and this material was too weak and was the reason
to change the material.
Though this revolver was the improved type, please use, as Dave already mentioned, only
blck powder.

montenegrin
07-23-2008, 08:12 AM
Hello George,
Your Gasser revolver with 240mm barrel (instead of 184mm) marked with crowned NI (Nikola I, ruler of Montenegro 1860-1918) is obviously not a common M1870/74 army type revolver but rather the famous Gasser's Montenegrin pattern. This was originaly introduced in the early 1870s but your specimen was made circa 1900. Special markings on cylinder and barrel are supposed to be Turkish property marks.
Cases can be easily made by reworking 7.62x54R Russian brass. Original lead bullets were 11.3mm diameter - .445 (according to an old Austrian Army manual), but a barrel I measured was 11.4mm groove diameter - .449, in which case I would be inclined to try a .451-452 lead bullet intended for .45 Colt.
Kind regards,
Jani

varifleman
07-23-2008, 12:55 PM
Thanks to Jan, Dave, Heinrich and Jani for the replies. I'm pleased to find that the revolver is the Montenegran pattern with Turkish acceptance marks. I'll try to get 20 or so rounds from one of the vintage cartridge dealers but would appreciate anyone having a lead on anyone having the right cartridges available. Thanks

Thalis
08-01-2008, 06:50 PM
G e n t l e m e n,

I have really enjoyed your fascinating and based on solid technical and historical knolwedge discussion on www.gunboards.com (http://www.gunboards.com) concerning the antique and massive 11mm Gasser Montenegrin revolver. As I'm also a great fun of this awkward, huge and "ugly" (according to "Guns & Ammo") - yet technically innovative for its time and 100% solid - antique revolver, I hereby attach some photos of my recently aquired antique 11.3mm GASSER Mod. 1870 "Montenegrino" (or Montenegrin) revolver. It has been produced by cast steel (so-called: "GUSS STAHL") in 1870 by "Leupold Gasser Waffenfabrik" in Wien (then capital of the Austrohungarian Empire) and bears a very low S/N (i.e. #175#) which indicates early 1870 production. Its barrel's diameter measures 11mm and it bears a 23cm barrel and a 6 chambers' revolving turret, suitable for the 11.3mm x 51Rmm (Long) Montenegrin B.P. ammo, having a rim diameter of 11.5mm. As the 11mm GASSER Montenegrin revolver was invented by Leupold Gasser, whom was also granted the related patent in 1870, its main manufacturer has been the "Leupold Gasser Waffenfanrik" which was later transformed to "Rust & Gasser Waffenfabrik" (i.e. the company that produced later the better known antique 8mm Rust Gasser Mod. 1898 8 chambers' revolver up to the end of WW I). Due to huge orders for the 11mm Gasser Montenegrin revolver issued to "Leupold Gasser Waffenfabrik" not only by the civilians and Armed Forces of Montenegro (King Nikolai of Montenegro was one of the main stockholders in "Leupold Gasser Waffenfabrik" and is well known for issuing a one-of-a-kind legislative decret according to which each adult male citizen of Montenegro was obliged to bear at least 1 Montenegrin revolver with him anytime!!!), but also by the rest of the Balkan (Serbian, Greek, Bulgarian, Ottoman and Austrohungarian) Armies of the pre-WW I era, Gasser was unable to undertake all orders for Montenegrin revolvers and thus has been obliged to allow the production of Montenegrin revolvers to various well known and unknown Belgian and French gunmakers like Francotte, Lefacheux etc. This awkward situation has led to a total poduction of more than 200.000 - 220.000 (based on mere estimations) 11mm GASSER Mod. 1870/1874 "Montenegrino" revolvers by Leupold Gasser, Rust & Gasser, Lefacheux, Farncotte and many more small and unknown Belgian gunmakers for both civilian and army use up to the end of WW I. Under these production circumstances it can be easily understood why the 11mm Montenegrin ammo can only be typified under one of the following ammo categories: a) 11.2mm x 29.5mm, b) 11.3mm x 51Rmm, c) 11.3mm x 36Rmm, d) 11.75mm x 36mm "Short Montenegrin" and e) 11.75mm x 51mm "Long Montenegrin". The 11mm GASSER Mod. 1870/1874 "Montenegrino" revolver saw extensive military action during WW I mainly by the Autrohungarian Armed Forces (it has been issued as standard sidearm to the cavalry troopers) and it's also well known for being used not only by the mexican rebels under Pancho Villa's guidance during the US/Mexican war of 1916 (Pancho Villa bought by a famous american firearms' dealer of the early 20th century a confiscated by the US Governement firerams' load of more than 5.000 11mm Montenegrin revolvers that was going to be delivered in South America by sea and which had been previously modified in .44 S&W Russian CAL.), but also for the assassination of the King George I of Greece by a mad man firing 3 shots against the King in October 1912, a few days after Thessaloniki's liberation by the Greek Army during the 1st Balkan War. The 11.75mm x 51Rmm Montenegrin round is loaded with B.P. ONLY (always remember that the frames and barrels of the 11mm GASSER Mod. 1870/1874 "Montenegrino" revolvers are made of cast steel - the so-called: "GUSS STAHL" - based on obsolete late 19th century production methods) and is able to deliver a 312 grain lead bullet through its 23 - 24cm long rifled barrel to long distanced targets with excellent accuracy and slightly lower stopping power in comparaison to the .45 Long Colt. Shortened and trimmed .45-70 brass hulls seem to be the ideal base for producing handloaded 11.3mm Montenegrin B.P. ammo, but .44 S&W Russian and .44 S&W Special along with .45-50 Peabody brass is also a good base for reloading experimentation. Ready to fire 11mm Montenegrin B.P. ammo can be ordered by "STARS AND STRIPES AMMO" but is also occasionally available on firerams' auctions. Upon request I could post some very interesting links on this intriguing large bore and massive antique revolver, also to give you some tips on reloading the various configurations of the 11mm GASSER Montenegrin round which has been declared as obsolete ammo in US since 1986 according to the 2nd Amendement. I'll be glad and anxious to read your future comments on my posting...

Olefogey
08-01-2008, 08:15 PM
Thalis,

Very nice write up and history lesson!!

Dave

George Roth
08-02-2008, 01:18 PM
Gentlemen,

I also am fascinatd by your very serious and intensive discussion on the Gasser M70. But the most impotant thing was not mentioned:

Indroduced in the Austro-Hungarian Armed Forces (Army and Navy) in 1870, it was the most advanced and modern ordnance revolver of the period:

Double Action and
Center Fire

Which country had this too in 1870? I do not know one.......

A few corrections:

Leopold Gasser instead of Leupold
Rast & Gasser instead of Rust

"Guss-Stahl" is the Austrian term for Bessemer steel, the most advanced steel production method of the second half of the 19th century. So the Guss-Stahl was not a inferior quality - on the contrary! This kind of steel was not the same as cast iron in steel.

Barrel, cylinder and frame of the M70 were of iron, the main parts of the M70/47 was of this steel to prevent damages by too high pressure of the ammunition. The reason was simple: In the Austrian cavalry the Werndl carbine was chambered for the same round (11.2 x 36 R), but the charge was about the double amount. The carbine rounds had a gilding metal case and the revolver cartridges a brass case to prevent mix ups. Of course mix ups happened. This was the reason to introduce a steel frame. The second step was to introduce a shortened case in 1882 (11.2 x 29 R) to have a visual difference between the two ammo types in the cavalry. The load (and ballistics) of the revolver round remained the same, only the wad between charge and bullet (spacer) was rejected.

That's it, fellow collectors! And do not forget: I am not an English native speaker!

As ever
George Roth alias Josef Moetz, author of the Austrian pistol book

varifleman
08-03-2008, 01:08 PM
Thalis, thanks for your very imformative presentation on your 11mm Gasser. I enjoyed comparing it to my Austrian-made 11mm revolver. Please do post the links for more information on these very interesting revolvers and ammo hints. I'm looking forward to getting some ammunition so I can fire mine a few times. I'd also be interested in any information about the Turkish markings on my revolver. George

montenegrin
08-07-2008, 02:24 AM
Hello Thalis,
You have some interesting information I must say. The story that Pancho Villa bought 5,000+ Montenegrin revolvers is a new one for me; could you please tell the source for this information? Also, is the revolver that killed King George I preserved in some Greek museum?
Thank you and kind regards,
Jani

Morgan Kane
08-15-2008, 05:36 AM
Varifleman; I think it's best to be carefull shooting them, would suggest mild loads.. I have a 11.75mm x 51mm "Long Montenegrin" myself. But it's in poor condition and I have never fired it. It was some interesting new information for me in this tread:)

varifleman
08-22-2008, 01:09 PM
Morgan, thanks for the advise, I'll be sure to use mild loads. Can you post photos of your Gasser Montenegrin pistol? it would make an interesting comparison to mine and others.

varifleman
08-23-2008, 11:42 AM
Anybody have a good source for repeoduction holster and ammo pouch for the Gasser 1870 Montenegrin revolver?

Heinrich
08-24-2008, 04:02 AM
Go to www.ledermanufaktur-zimmermann.de

I think he needs a sample or a sketch or plan with dimensiones.

montenegrin
08-26-2008, 10:16 AM
Different kinds of Gasser and Rast-Gasser holsters are made by Jaroslav Rezac from Czech Republic:

www.militarie-repliky.cz

[email protected]

lionrobe
10-04-2008, 05:09 PM
Forgive please my terrible english as froggie.

Just bought an alleged austrian Gasser with no marks which gets a shoulder stick. Seems there are few like this one and I would be interested to know more ?
BEST WISHES

http://www.zimagez.com/miniature/dsc0159110.jpg (http://www.zimagez.com/zimage/dsc0159110.php)
http://www.zimagez.com/miniature/dsc015856.jpg (http://www.zimagez.com/zimage/dsc015856.php)
http://www.zimagez.com/miniature/dsc015909.jpg (http://www.zimagez.com/zimage/dsc015909.php)
http://www.zimagez.com/miniature/dsc015946.jpg (http://www.zimagez.com/zimage/dsc015946.php)

montenegrin
10-04-2008, 05:46 PM
Lionrobe,
Similar "Gasser Montenegrin" revolvers with colapsible shoulder stocks were offered by Manufrance of St. Etienne in the 1890s as "Revolver des garde-chasse". They were likely made in Liege.
With kind regards,
Jani

lionrobe
10-04-2008, 05:57 PM
Lionrobe,
Similar "Gasser Montenegrin" revolvers with colapsible shoulder stocks were offered by Manufrance of St. Etienne in the 1890s as "Revolver des garde-chasse". They were likely made in Liege.
With kind regards,
Jani

A lot of thanks, that was exactly the theory of my arms manufacturer !

a gamekeeper is not exactly Pancho Villa, but...-:)

Anyway, it's a fantastic gun I once noticed in my twenties, I know how it seems ugly for most of the guys, but it's really impressive, tough, solid. It's a plebeian weapon for hard countries. I DO like my Gasser !!!!

montenegrin
10-04-2008, 06:06 PM
Lionrobe,
I certainly agree with you, these revolvers are fantastique!
And not to forget: welcome among us, lionrobe!
Kind regards,
Jani

lionrobe
10-05-2008, 11:27 AM
Hi all, seems there were a lot of models (see all the links)
http://www.sunblest.net/gun/Gass80.htm

and more, rotating barrel !

http://www.zimagez.com/miniature/cu-znda.jpg (http://www.zimagez.com/zimage/cu-znda.php)

lionrobe
10-05-2008, 06:37 PM
A guy said we can view the gun in "The illusionist" and "MC Cabe and Mrs Miller". Lucky man, I had both in an external HD.

http://www.zimagez.com/miniature/bscap0033.jpg (http://www.zimagez.com/zimage/bscap0033.php)

http://www.zimagez.com/miniature/bscap0122.jpg (http://www.zimagez.com/zimage/bscap0122.php)

http://www.zimagez.com/miniature/bscap0148.jpg (http://www.zimagez.com/zimage/bscap0148.php)

http://www.zimagez.com/miniature/bscap00430.jpg (http://www.zimagez.com/zimage/bscap00430.php)

http://www.zimagez.com/miniature/bscap0152.jpg (http://www.zimagez.com/zimage/bscap0152.php)

http://www.zimagez.com/miniature/bscap0163.jpg (http://www.zimagez.com/zimage/bscap0163.php)
http://forums.gunboards.com/images/misc/progress.gif http://forums.gunboards.com/images/buttons/edit.gif (http://forums.gunboards.com/editpost.php?do=editpost&p=515737)

lionrobe
11-18-2008, 01:37 PM
Different kinds of Gasser and Rast-Gasser holsters are made by Jaroslav Rezac from Czech Republic:

www.militarie-repliky.cz (http://www.militarie-repliky.cz)

[email protected]

A lot of thanks for the link, in a couple of weeks you'll have photos of mines, coming soon :
http://www.militarie-repliky.cz/en/gasser_dustojnik.php
http://www.militarie-repliky.cz/en/patrontaska_ke_gasser_1890.php

I have a plan for ivory plates for the stick.

Recently shot self-made cartridges 451 wallcut,1,10 grams of blackpowder, I had black hands each time at the end but it was a very funny moment, stick shoulder gives a great help, I must recognize.

Best wishes.

lionrobe
11-22-2008, 06:00 PM
Anyway, I think I was very lucky to find this magnificent revolver. I'm an ol'guy but very young shooter, and I would appreciate a little push. I'm learning to make my own cartridges, it's not very easy to install my reloading press recently bought (roack chucker supreme). Who heard of written tutorial or clip on Youtube describing installation of reloading press and reloading step by step ?

Thanks in advance.

lionrobe
11-24-2008, 03:15 PM
I'm waiting for them !

http://www.zimagez.com/miniature/pb200018-1024x768-.jpg (http://www.zimagez.com/zimage/pb200018-1024x768-.php)

http://www.zimagez.com/miniature/pb200019-1024x768-.jpg (http://www.zimagez.com/zimage/pb200019-1024x768-.php)

http://www.zimagez.com/miniature/pb180021-1024x768-.jpg (http://www.zimagez.com/zimage/pb180021-1024x768-.php)

http://www.zimagez.com/miniature/pb180022-1024x768-.jpg (http://www.zimagez.com/zimage/pb180022-1024x768-.php)

Ron Wood
11-24-2008, 03:32 PM
The quality and workmanship of the replica leather is outstanding!

lionrobe
11-25-2008, 12:56 PM
The quality and workmanship of the replica leather is outstanding!

I must confess, it's a reproduction, never found an original in gunshows, only for Rast Gasser, too short.

Vic S
03-10-2011, 10:43 AM
I need some help . I just picked up a rusty 5 shot fluted cylinder (Rast / Gasser revolver) looks like a model 1870 marked with a crown with a NI underit on top of the barrel right in front of the cylinder. Can any body give me history or infomation on .

Vic S

montenegrin
03-10-2011, 11:32 AM
Vic,
you have a lot of general information here already. If you want more specific info, I would need barrel lenght, serial number, and all markings; photos would be of greatest help too needless to say.
With kind regards,
Jani

Vic S
03-10-2011, 08:00 PM
Jani

The barrel lenght is 4-3/4"
Serial #21312
The cylinder also has some type of stamp on it.
It has wooden grips and lanyard ring also
When I get my camera back i will send a few pictures of this pistol

Thanks you for your help!
Vic S

montenegrin
03-10-2011, 08:20 PM
Vic,
Is it solid frame, or open top? Since there are no additional markings, photos would be essential for a positive ID.
Kind regards,
Jani

Vic S
03-11-2011, 08:16 PM
Jani

It is a open frame

Vic S

Vic S
03-11-2011, 08:26 PM
Jani
I took some pictures but i do not know to attach them yet. I will be out of town for a week so when I get back I will get help and send these pictures to you ASAP.
Thank you.
Vic S

Montenegro69
10-05-2011, 12:33 AM
Hi all,
im interested to buy this Montenegro Gasser..anybody know where to buy? how much is the price for this gun?...im buying this for my friend for Christmas present:)
thanks!

Montenegro69
10-05-2011, 12:35 AM
G e n t l e m e n,

I have really enjoyed your fascinating and based on solid technical and historical knolwedge discussion on www.gunboards.com (http://www.gunboards.com) concerning the antique and massive 11mm Gasser Montenegrin revolver. As I'm also a great fun of this awkward, huge and "ugly" (according to "Guns & Ammo") - yet technically innovative for its time and 100% solid - antique revolver, I hereby attach some photos of my recently aquired antique 11.3mm GASSER Mod. 1870 "Montenegrino" (or Montenegrin) revolver. It has been produced by cast steel (so-called: "GUSS STAHL") in 1870 by "Leupold Gasser Waffenfabrik" in Wien (then capital of the Austrohungarian Empire) and bears a very low S/N (i.e. #175#) which indicates early 1870 production. Its barrel's diameter measures 11mm and it bears a 23cm barrel and a 6 chambers' revolving turret, suitable for the 11.3mm x 51Rmm (Long) Montenegrin B.P. ammo, having a rim diameter of 11.5mm. As the 11mm GASSER Montenegrin revolver was invented by Leupold Gasser, whom was also granted the related patent in 1870, its main manufacturer has been the "Leupold Gasser Waffenfanrik" which was later transformed to "Rust & Gasser Waffenfabrik" (i.e. the company that produced later the better known antique 8mm Rust Gasser Mod. 1898 8 chambers' revolver up to the end of WW I). Due to huge orders for the 11mm Gasser Montenegrin revolver issued to "Leupold Gasser Waffenfabrik" not only by the civilians and Armed Forces of Montenegro (King Nikolai of Montenegro was one of the main stockholders in "Leupold Gasser Waffenfabrik" and is well known for issuing a one-of-a-kind legislative decret according to which each adult male citizen of Montenegro was obliged to bear at least 1 Montenegrin revolver with him anytime!!!), but also by the rest of the Balkan (Serbian, Greek, Bulgarian, Ottoman and Austrohungarian) Armies of the pre-WW I era, Gasser was unable to undertake all orders for Montenegrin revolvers and thus has been obliged to allow the production of Montenegrin revolvers to various well known and unknown Belgian and French gunmakers like Francotte, Lefacheux etc. This awkward situation has led to a total poduction of more than 200.000 - 220.000 (based on mere estimations) 11mm GASSER Mod. 1870/1874 "Montenegrino" revolvers by Leupold Gasser, Rust & Gasser, Lefacheux, Farncotte and many more small and unknown Belgian gunmakers for both civilian and army use up to the end of WW I. Under these production circumstances it can be easily understood why the 11mm Montenegrin ammo can only be typified under one of the following ammo categories: a) 11.2mm x 29.5mm, b) 11.3mm x 51Rmm, c) 11.3mm x 36Rmm, d) 11.75mm x 36mm "Short Montenegrin" and e) 11.75mm x 51mm "Long Montenegrin". The 11mm GASSER Mod. 1870/1874 "Montenegrino" revolver saw extensive military action during WW I mainly by the Autrohungarian Armed Forces (it has been issued as standard sidearm to the cavalry troopers) and it's also well known for being used not only by the mexican rebels under Pancho Villa's guidance during the US/Mexican war of 1916 (Pancho Villa bought by a famous american firearms' dealer of the early 20th century a confiscated by the US Governement firerams' load of more than 5.000 11mm Montenegrin revolvers that was going to be delivered in South America by sea and which had been previously modified in .44 S&W Russian CAL.), but also for the assassination of the King George I of Greece by a mad man firing 3 shots against the King in October 1912, a few days after Thessaloniki's liberation by the Greek Army during the 1st Balkan War. The 11.75mm x 51Rmm Montenegrin round is loaded with B.P. ONLY (always remember that the frames and barrels of the 11mm GASSER Mod. 1870/1874 "Montenegrino" revolvers are made of cast steel - the so-called: "GUSS STAHL" - based on obsolete late 19th century production methods) and is able to deliver a 312 grain lead bullet through its 23 - 24cm long rifled barrel to long distanced targets with excellent accuracy and slightly lower stopping power in comparaison to the .45 Long Colt. Shortened and trimmed .45-70 brass hulls seem to be the ideal base for producing handloaded 11.3mm Montenegrin B.P. ammo, but .44 S&W Russian and .44 S&W Special along with .45-50 Peabody brass is also a good base for reloading experimentation. Ready to fire 11mm Montenegrin B.P. ammo can be ordered by "STARS AND STRIPES AMMO" but is also occasionally available on firerams' auctions. Upon request I could post some very interesting links on this intriguing large bore and massive antique revolver, also to give you some tips on reloading the various configurations of the 11mm GASSER Montenegrin round which has been declared as obsolete ammo in US since 1986 according to the 2nd Amendement. I'll be glad and anxious to read your future comments on my posting...




thanks for this history information...would you sell this gun?

montenegrin
10-05-2011, 10:12 AM
Hello Montenegro69,
A genuine Montenegro Gasser is offered by Horst Held at $1350.
With kind regards,
Jani

Montenegro69
10-05-2011, 04:53 PM
http://www.collectorsfirearms.com/admin/product_details.php?itemID=30042


i (http://www.collectorsfirearms.com/admin/product_details.php?itemID=30042) bought this one today for $1,000.00 :)

montenegrin
10-05-2011, 06:37 PM
My congratulations, Jovane!

With kind regards,
Jani

Montenegro69
10-16-2011, 01:19 PM
Hvala!

baileyboy0563
04-06-2012, 05:47 AM
Hi im new to the site and i see that you have posted pictures of the gasser revolvers and was wondering if you could help me with identifiying one revolver that i have ?

Heinrich
04-06-2012, 07:35 AM
Hello baileyboy0563,

can you take some clear pictures with close ups?
This would be very helpfully.

Thalis
08-18-2012, 06:03 AM
Dear Montenegro69 !

I'm affraid that the specific 11.3 mm Gasser M1870 "Montenegrino" revolver which is pictured in the 8 attaced photos after my message is not for sale. Nevertheless I have acquired in U.S.A. a shorter barrelled (if memory serves me well, its barrel has a length of ca. 7" - 8") 11.3 mm "Montenegrin" made in Belgium by unknown independent gunsmith and according to its pervious owner it was sold to him in Mexico in the ealry 1970's by a sellers of antiques who claimed that it was used by Pancho Villa's rebels in Mexico during the well known U.S. - Mexican conflict of 1913 over Texas. The specific 11.3 mm "Montenegrin" revolver is in prestine condition and works flawlessly. It it finely decorated with deep engravings on it receiver and a kind of nickel platina on its outer metal surfaces, bearing also a pair of nice ivory or bone grips. I would rate its overall condition in VG+ according to NRA's graduation on use firearms' condition (I would rate the overall condition of the prictured in the aforementioned 8 photos long barrelled 11.3 mm Gasser M1870 "Montenegrino" revolver of mine as G+ only). As you are well aware of, the specific obsolete revolver is also classified as "antique" according to the Federal U.S. Firearms Legislation, as being manufactured prior to 1899. I have bought it about 2 years ago (after setting the highest bid on its e-auction in U.S.A.) and it's currently in posssession of my Firearms Dealer in Glasgow, MT. If you would like to view and/or to purchase it in U.S.A. (you are a U.S. citizen, if I'm not mistaken), please feel free to e-mail me anytime:cool:.

Best reqards to you and all the forum members: Thalis

Thalis
08-18-2012, 06:15 AM
thanks for this history information...would you sell this gun?

Dear Montenegro 69!

I have applied on 19.8.2012 to your request dated 5.10.2011. Unfortunately the 11.3 mm Gasser M1870 Montenegrino revolver which is shown in the 8 attached photos of mine is not for sale, but I have for sale a 11.3 mm Montenegrin revolver madei in Belgium which is in better overall condition (VG+). You are most welcome to view and examine it in person in U.S.A. in order to decide if you are willing to buy it or not, because by mere coincidence it's still in possession of my Firearms Dealer located in Glasgow, MT. The specific 11.3 mm Montenegrin revolver has a special historical value as it was acquired by teh previous owner from Mexico in the early 1970's where it was encountered war service with Pancho Villa's rebells during the US - Mexican war of 1913. Please feel free to view my fuull answer to your e-mail dated 5.10.2011 on Page 5 of the present topic on this forum. By all means I'll be looking forward to hear from you soon.

Best regards: Thalis

Thalis
08-18-2012, 07:46 AM
thanks for this history information...would you sell this gun?
Gents of the Luger forum!
I'm very happy to announce you the 1st serious attempt to reload ammo for the 11.3 mm Gasser M70/74 "Montenegrin" revolver by a well known firearms' Guru of teh famous "Guns & Ammo" magasine. Trust me and just have a look to the excellent following URL: http://archives.gunsandammo.com/content/gasser-revolver?page=1 . You will find under the specific URL a valuable wealth of thoroughly founded answers on reloading, technical and historical data concerning the above mentioned old and obsolete but always reliable, versatile and by sure most deadly (as producing a devastating 330 sq.lbs. stopping power !!!) in case of enemy encounter revolver. You may also view some reloading suggestions of mine for the 11.3 mm Gasser Montenegrin round by visiting the following URL: www.thefirearmsforum.com under the topic: "Curio and relic" with subject: "2nd Montenegrin Gasser info needed":cool:.
Regards: Thalis

Dan O'Connell
01-06-2014, 03:42 AM
Greetings, I have an old revolver that I inheritted when my father passed away and finally descided to try to research it a bit and this post had the closest I could find to what I have. Although my revolver has a much shorter barrel. It appears the front site was removed and there is no rear site. I even have the holster it came with. I will try to attach a few photos if I can figure out how. Any additional info would be hugely appreciated.
Best Regards,
DOC101643101644101645101646101647101648

montenegrin
01-06-2014, 09:02 AM
This is one of the last Gasser 11mm revolvers, commercially proofed in Vienna in 1914. This small 5-shot Montenegrin version, a late derivative of the model 1870, is usually called Officers' Model. During WWI it was accepted by the Austrian Landwehr. The somewhat fuzzy unit marking seems to be 23 LSt R / 3, presumably 23rd Landsturm Regiment, weapon number 3. An interesting piece but not worth much due to missing parts.

With kind regards,
Jani
([email protected])

Manowar
04-20-2014, 06:52 AM
It looks like a 70/74 Montenegrin to me. The barrel looks shortened and the rear sight and lanyard loop are missing - anything else? When do you think this revolver was made? What is the story for having commercial, Landwehr and King Nikita markings on the same revolver?

montenegrin
04-20-2014, 07:57 AM
The barrel does not look shortened to me, normal length for this model was 130mm. 1914 proof indicates production in same year. This specimen was made as a commercial Gasser's Montenegrin revolver just before WWI and acquired and pressed into service by the Landwehr due to shortage of standard handguns during the war.
With kind regards,
Jani