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Thread: Luger Artillery Rear Sight Latch & Spring

  1. #1
    johnjohn Guest

    Default Luger Artillery Rear Sight Latch & Spring

    Gentlemen,
    I have a 1917 DWM LP08 Luger (I think) s/n 6010.Germany is stamped under the barrel along with the numbers 6484 and 883. Some of the numbers match. I bought the gun because the price was reasonable, the finish was good (and uniform) and the bore was very good. It has turned out to be an excellent shooter with an aftermarket magazine. The original magazine is too worn hold in cartridges reliably. The rear sight (it is tuned, the front is fixed)
    Here is where I need some advice:
    The slide that elevates the rear sight will not lock in place. Recoil pushes the slide forward elevating the rear sight just a bit after each shot. I can buy a new pin and spring but it is not obvious how to replace it. There could be a bit of dirt keeping the pin from latching. Suggestions would be appreciated
    Regards,
    John LaRue


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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Colorado/Arizona, USA.
    Posts
    6,028

    Default

    John, Welcome to the Forum and congratulations on your Artillery shooter!

    This is a common problem that new parts will be unlikely to fix.The sight is large and with recoil it tends to move around. Just a design flaw.

    During a shooting session, take a plastic tie and slip it around the barrel and sight to hold it in place. After, clip it off.

    You keep original parts installed, sight stays put, ties are cheap.

    Kind of a bubba approach but it works. I would suggest the parts change but that won't work, at least for any amount of time.

    Jerry Burney

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    UK
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    1,392

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    `Tis true! replacement parts will not solve the problem. I use Loctite. If needs be, it can easily be released with boiling water (or a hot air gun).

  4. #4
    johnjohn Guest

    Default

    Thank you all for your suggestions.

    I had tried a cable tie and it worked perfectly but I just couldnt stand the way it looked.

    The solution turned out to be simple. When I drove the front sight pin out, I found that the compression spring was not original, unless they made stanless steel then. I stretched the spring a bit to give it more compression. Then most important, I turned a brass pin that just fit to the inside diameter of the spring but left the fixed end of the pin opposite the spring about .060 inches long so that it had the effect of shorting the spring system. The sight now locks in place perfectly at any position and the pistol will group 14 shots in a 2 inch circle at 60 feet. Now that I know it shoots, I think I will retire it with the other antiques, subject to an occasional demonstaration.

    Thanks again for the suggestions if anyone can make sense out of the marks on the enclosed photo (actually done on a flatbed scanner)
    I would apperciate the information.
    Best regards
    John LaRue

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Indiana, USA.
    Posts
    378

    Default

    John,
    Welcome to the forum.
    Attached Photo????
    Tom

  6. #6
    johnjohn Guest

    Default

    [quote]Originally posted by tomathvl

    John,
    Welcome to the forum.
    Attached Photo????
    Tom
    [/

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    Tom ,
    Thanks for your note. As you can tell, I have a lot to learn about how the Forum works.
    Regards,
    John

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Europe
    Posts
    2,683

    Default

    Hi,

    Interesting combination.
    The mark on the right (squashed bird) is the original firing proof. It shows that the barrel survived a test shooting with a high pressure test round.
    The 3 crowned marks are Imperial Army Inspectors markings.
    The flat Crown/N is a German commercial firing proof from before 1939. It appears that this gun was retested in Germany between 1918 and 1939 and got the Crown/N as a 'test passed' marking.

    Co-Author 'The Parabellum Is Back! 1945-2000'.

  8. #8
    johnjohn Guest

    Default

    quote:Originally posted by Vlim

    Hi,

    Interesting combination.
    The mark on the right (squashed bird) is the original firing proof. It shows that the barrel survived a test shooting with a high pressure test round.
    The 3 crowned marks are Imperial Army Inspectors markings.
    The flat Crown/N is a German commercial firing proof from before 1939. It appears that this gun was retested in Germany between 1918 and 1939 and got the Crown/N as a 'test passed' marking.

  9. #9
    johnjohn Guest

    Default

    [quote]Originally posted by Vlim

    Hi,

    Interesting combination.
    The mark on the right (squashed bird) is the original firing proof. It shows that the barrel survived a test shooting with a high pressure test round.
    The 3 crowned marks are Imperial Army Inspectors markings.
    The flat Crown/N is a German commercial firing proof from before 1939. It appears that this gun was retested in Germany between 1918 and 1939 and got the Crown/N as a 'test passed' marking.

    Thanks very much. This is very helpful. It helps explain the numbers under the barrel 6484 and 883. There is also a faint mark just below the rear sight. It would appear that the gun was reworked in Germany soon before it was retested. Here is the other side of the luger:
    Best regards and thanks to all for the help.
    John laRue
    Dallas

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