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Thread: PICTURES - 1911 Erfurt - unit marked

  1. #1
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    Default PICTURES - 1911 Erfurt - unit marked

    All,

    I'm new to the boards, and to Lugers. I inherited my father's Luger. I've been learning about it by reading here. It is a 1911 Erfurt. I will post pictures soon. It has unit markings, and came with a holster, just one clip though (aluminum bottom...when was the wood used?)

    So please help a newbie understand something. My dad said he bought this Luger in the late 1960's from a WWII vet's son whose father took it off a German prisoner. The vet was in a Nisei battalion (Japanese Americans who fought in Europe) and took it from a German in Italy.

    Did the German Army collect them after WWI and re-issue them before WWII? Like when the soldier who was originally issued it in 1911 left service, they put it in the armory and re-issued?

    Sorry for no pictures yet...I hope to get them on tonight!

    Thanks,

    Pdxsk

    UPDATE: Adding pictures

    A couple notes..one of the grips has damage, it was repaired you'll notice. Also, the locking bolt is NOT original. My dad said (take it with a grain of salt) that when the vet brought it over from Germany, he had to make it non-fireable to get it back to the States...but I don't know if that is true or not.

    Can anyone tell me what the unit markings represent?

    Thank you
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    Last edited by pdxsk; 05-16-2011 at 10:43 PM. Reason: adding pictures

  2. #2
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    Default

    Many WWI service weapons were used in WWII especially Lugers. How does the unit marking read and what is the serial number?
    " 'To everything there is a season...a time for war and a time for peace'. and this is the time for war". Reverend Peter Muhlenberg, January 21, 1776, Woodstock, Virginia

  3. #3
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    Default Underside of Barrel

    I forgot a shot of the underside of the barrel.

    It has the same serial number, but what does the "8,84" designate?

    Pdxsk
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  4. #4
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    Default

    8,84 is the land to land measurement; that it met acceptable standards and thus was marked.

    Welcome to the forum Scott


    Ed
    Edward Tinker
    ************
    Veteran Bring Backs Vol III 2012
    Co-Author of Police Lugers 2012
    Author of Veteran Bring Backs Vol I & Vet Bring Backs Vol II, a collection of stories on guns & equipment brought back by GI's.
    Co-Author of the book Simson Lugers
    Have all books available for purchase

  5. #5
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    Default Markings

    Quote Originally Posted by Edward Tinker View Post
    8,84 is the land to land measurement; that it met acceptable standards and thus was marked.

    Welcome to the forum Scott


    Ed

    Thank you for the info! I'm getting an education here. I posted pictures of the many marks on the pistol. If anyone can tell me more about the history of what those marks mean, I would love to read it. The unit markings, etc. Or suggest a book I could reference to look them up would be great too.

  6. #6
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    Default

    The unit mark indicates that the pistol was issued to a medic in WWI and before. The unit was the 12th Train Battalion, second medical company, weapon 247. All German medics were armed with pistols.

    I have two 1911 Erfurts here that were issued to the 1st and 2nd companies of the 12th Train battalion. The only 1911 Erfurts that I have seen marked to medical units were to the 12th Train Battalion. None of the DWMs I have seen marked to medical companies were issued to the 12th.
    " 'To everything there is a season...a time for war and a time for peace'. and this is the time for war". Reverend Peter Muhlenberg, January 21, 1776, Woodstock, Virginia

  7. #7
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    Default

    Hi Scott, Here's a picture of a Luger armed medic (an Iron Cross winner, too!). Regards, Norm
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  8. #8
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    Default Re-blue or not?

    Thank you for the unit explanation and what a cool picture!

    This gun sat in my dad's closet for the past 40 years. I remember shooting it in the 80's with him.

    I've read lots about whether or not a Luger has been reblued and straw percentage...can you tell by the pictures if this was reblued?

    Also, if anyone can give me an idea of what amount to insure it for under my homeowners, I would appreciate it. I'm wondering if the replaced locking pin and cracked grip on the one side take away from the value very much.

    Scott
    Last edited by pdxsk; 05-17-2011 at 11:21 AM. Reason: spelling correction

  9. #9
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    Default

    Refinished for sure. This all but reduces the gun to shooter status. As far as a dollar value in my opinion, 1000 on the top end. It is to bad this early Erfurt went under the buffer.

  10. #10
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    Default My 1912 erfurt marked b.1.t.s.2.243

    This 1912 Erfurt Luger is marked to Bavarian Train Battalion 1, Medical Company 2, weapon number 243. Or in German, Bayerisches Train-Bataillon 1, Sanitats-Kompagnie 2, Waffe Nr. 243. It came with one matching magazine and 1911 dated holster.
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