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Thread: Question about firing pins

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
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    S.E. Iowa
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    8

    Default Question about firing pins

    As a new collector; are firing pins different? What are the differences? Are they interchangable? I've heard of grooved, non grooved, etc. My DWM's firing pin is un-numbered, but I found one numbered to my pistol. They look the same, but are they?
    Thanks

  2. #2
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    Default

    Hi Tom, welcome to the forum. To my knowledge, DWM firing pins were "solid" (no grooves, aka flutes). Those in military pistols were numbered, and to my knowledge commercial guns' firing pins were not. The fluted firing pins were introduced later by Mauser and were made that way to relieve chamber pressures and/or keep things cleaner. Whether or not they did that is debatable, but that was the idea. So fluted firing pins are likely from 1934 or later.

    There's an old thread about it here - http://luger.gunboards.com/showthrea...ed-Firing-Pin!
    Seeking a 1908 Bulgarian contract Luger magazine (early DWM P.08) with a C suffix. See the example at http://luger.gunboards.com/attachmen...3&d=1414271032 (on the right).

    Also looking for a DWM commercial takedown lever #01 and sideplate #77. Have the following magazines for sale/trade - double-proofed (early) Erfurt #5634a, single-proofed Erfurt #4294d, DWM #3494+, blued fxo / E/37 #5709r, postwar Erma SS w/black plastic bottom.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
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    NC
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    Very early DWM strikers are different from later ones.
    Most are identical from ca. 1904 to 1942; except for "fluting"- which the inventor claimed was to allow for dirt built up and to still function, not for any kind of pressure relief- though many believe this and continue to perpetuate the story.
    Swiss designed/produced strikers for later Swiss luger models are different.
    Differences are in the cocking tab on the striker projection which is moved by the lever arm on the middle toggle.
    03man - Don Voigt
    Luger student and collector
    Looking for DWM mil.side plates- 14,17,45
    Art. luger rear sight slide # 03

  4. #4
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    Nov 2014
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    Re: flutes, Gortz & Sturgess p.1115-1117 states that the primary or stated purpose of the flutes was to allow accumulated residue a means of travel away from the face of the firing pin. The thinner middle of the FP is intended to reduce friction and provide a “dirt trap”; the flutes provide a channel to the trap. It states that build-up of foreign material (absent the flutes) on a FP face could dampen the forward motion of the firing pin, so the flutes were primarily intended to make ignition more reliable. The section also mentions the flutes as providing an escape channel for gas in the event of a blown primer, but states that this was a secondary purpose.

    A Reichswehr directive of 9/17/30 ordered the flutes added to all firing pins in official inventory. Grinding wheels or files of 2.5mm were used to add the flutes; new production from the factory then included the flutes through the end of production in 1942.

    My own experience is, as practical matter firing pins are generally interchangeable between pistols. Although my one Model 1900 firing pin fits in and appears to operate correctly in a 1938 Mauser, the 1900 pin has a slightly different appearance including a thinner tip at the striker end. I will never fire the '38 with the 1900 pin for fear of an unpleasant surprise. I do swap later non-fluted DWM pins with fluted pins regularly without any issues.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
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    Ohio, USA.
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    Little show and tell on the difference between the very early ones and an Erfurt.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    dave

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Pearland Texas
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    I too am a new collector. I bought a Luger and it was sold as a reblued, rebarreled Sneak.
    It has very few serial numbers so don't really know the year. I broke my firing pin and bought
    a replacement from Interarms. It looks really close and seems to function but the little block
    part on the replacement is a little shorter. Might have made a mistake. Not sure if it will function
    shooting. Seems to work ok without firing.DSCF0002.jpgDSCF0004.jpg
    Last edited by Puretexan; 04-21-2017 at 11:17 AM. Reason: add another picture

  7. #7
    Join Date
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    That little block is just a guide for where it travels, so I don't think it will be a problem at all.
    Seeking a 1908 Bulgarian contract Luger magazine (early DWM P.08) with a C suffix. See the example at http://luger.gunboards.com/attachmen...3&d=1414271032 (on the right).

    Also looking for a DWM commercial takedown lever #01 and sideplate #77. Have the following magazines for sale/trade - double-proofed (early) Erfurt #5634a, single-proofed Erfurt #4294d, DWM #3494+, blued fxo / E/37 #5709r, postwar Erma SS w/black plastic bottom.

  8. #8
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    Apr 2017
    Location
    Pearland Texas
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    Default

    Thanks a bunch , makes me feel lots better.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
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    NC
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    The length of the rectangular part is irrelevant, it is the position of the front step that is the sear catch point.
    Well, I guess it could be so long as to not function, but that would likely not escape QC.
    03man - Don Voigt
    Luger student and collector
    Looking for DWM mil.side plates- 14,17,45
    Art. luger rear sight slide # 03

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Virginia - P.04 Navy Lugers
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    Default

    In addition to the striker pin point, the position and angle of the front of the sear block evolved over time.

    Here is an Old Model pin. You can see the long slender point and the short, nearly verticle position of front of the sear block.

    Old Model.jpg

    Compare that to this New Model pin from a P.08:

    P08.JPG

    The early New Model pins had a 45 degree front slope. In the Spring of 1906 the slope was changed to 51 degrees. You can see the difference in these views of the pins in the breech block. Note also that the angle of the camming surface coming down from the toggle also changes to match the pin.

    IMG_0540.jpg

    My date for the change is based on the fact that the change appeared around s/n 500 of the first Navy P.04 production contract in March 1906.
    The late, and final, DWM style is on the left. The right is an example of a 1904 or early 1906 P.04 style.
    Mike C.

    Member: NRA, NAPCA, N-SSA(Veteran)
    Life member: OVMS, VGCA
    Si vis pacem, para bellum

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