Page 1 of 10 12345 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 98

Thread: Grüße aus Berlin - 2020

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Berlin - P.04 Navy Lugers
    Posts
    2,617

    Default Grüße aus Berlin - 2020

    Well, it's a new year and I'm back in Berlin to continue my journey in the German language. I returned to the University for the Fall semester when I was home, where I took two German courses, one Literature and one Writing. Now I'm back in Berlin at the Goethe Institut where I can hopefully improve my speaking and hearing by being immersed in the language.

    Naturally I missed some of the friends I made here previously, but I've reconnected with many of them already and I'll make some new ones in school. My Turkish doctor friend is in Turkey, but returning as soon as her visa is approved. At some point she and I will go to Istanbul. I'm really looking forward to seeing the Hagia Sophia, Blue Mosque and Topkapi palace. Her home is Antalya, on the Mediterranean, so a few days on the beach are planned.

    My lovely Czech nurse is as sweet as ever. She landed her dream job at Charité, where she's an operating room anesthetist. She was working the day I arrived, but came over to my apartment the next day to bring me my Christmas present and Christmas cookies from her mother and more from her grandmother. Just like last year, she started by making a delicious Czech meal for me, then we went shopping at Ikea and the supermarket.

    The apartment is great. It's within walking distance of Goethe, and when the weather is bad I can take the U-bahn by walking out the back door, down the stairs into the U-bahnhof and pop up two stops later directly across the street from the school. Fifteen minutes after locking the apartment door I can be sitting in the classroom. Somewhat longer, obviously, if I walk. But it's only 1.6 kilometers, a good bit of it through Alexanderplatz. I'm on the 17th floor in a corner apartment, so I have pretty great views.

    0D9397DF-9ADF-43C6-956E-1BC293CADC71.jpeg 65B56B14-9975-4698-B236-C4C16E00D0A4.jpeg 4B0350B8-93C2-4600-92A8-8E20566EB4A7.jpeg
    Mike C.

    German Navy Small Arms 1848-1918
    Life member: NRA, OVMS, VGCA
    Member: NAPCA, N-SSA(Veteran)
    Si vis pacem, para bellum

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    5,641

    Default

    You're having too much fun Mike!
    How long do you plan to stay this trip?
    03man - Don Voigt
    Luger student and collector
    Looking for DWM mil.side plates- 69 and commercial # 32, Dreyse "K.S.Gendarmerie"

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Nampa, Idaho
    Posts
    953

    Default

    Mike,

    Thanks again for your adventure update. Keep adding pictures and stories as time allows.

    G2

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    North of Spokane, WA
    Posts
    12,992

    Default

    sounds great, have fun!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Berlin - P.04 Navy Lugers
    Posts
    2,617

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 03man View Post
    You're having too much fun Mike!
    How long do you plan to stay this trip?
    Classes until the end of June, then meet my wife in Copenhagen for a month. We fly out of Berlin on 31 July.
    Mike C.

    German Navy Small Arms 1848-1918
    Life member: NRA, OVMS, VGCA
    Member: NAPCA, N-SSA(Veteran)
    Si vis pacem, para bellum

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    north carolina
    Posts
    71

    Default

    Deutsch ist eine ganz leichte Sprache. Nach sechs Monaten werden Sie bestimmt Deutsch beherrschen. Die Aussprache in Berlin wuerde Ich aber nicht empfehlen. Ich hab’ schon zweimal in Deutschland gewohnnt (Baden Wuerttemburg).....auch zweimal in Orsterreich. Die Leute im Suden Sind etwas mehr fruendlich - wenigstens,meiner Meinung nach.....

    After 6 months you’ll be able to read Motz & Schuy with no problem. Viel Glueck!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    2,414

    Default

    Wonderful adventure, Mike. I have relatives in Munich (yes - south of the white sausage equator) and always enjoy being in Germany.

    Berlin is one of the world's great cities.

    I particularly admire your work and ability in mastering the German language.

    As you progress, perhaps you'd like to tackle some of Mauser's papers (including dealing with both the old formal German and his handwriting)? This proved quite a task to Mauro and Gerben while working on the book.
    Igitur si vis pacem, para bellum -
    - if you wish for peace, prepare for war.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Berlin - P.04 Navy Lugers
    Posts
    2,617

    Default

    Unlike my teachers, both here and the US, I have no problem with the old German print (aka Black letter or Fraktu), which allows me to read the old navy manuals, etc.

    Handwriting, on the other hand, is either difficult or impossible. Just as the US had two different handwriting systems promoted by educators (Palmer and Spencer methods) the German had Kurrent and Sütterlin. Oddly enough I can sometimes read the later Sütterlin, but the older Kurrent looks like the jagged edge of an old handsaw that badly needs retoothing. Once I'm up to speed in German and have finished the translation classes I will take a summer course in reading the old script aimed mostly at researchers and museum people. All the old German is interesting because it has 14 additional characters. Some are still used in modern German, i.e. the characters with Umlauts. But old German has two forms of "s", a long ſ and short s, both of which were also used in old English. In addition, there are ligatures, two characters combined into one. The only old German ligature that survives into modern German is the ß.

    Last, but certainly not least, the language has evolved. Some old words are found only in my monster copy of the Duden (the official dictionary and usage guide to the German language), they are left out of modern dictionaries. In addition, there are many military terms that can't be found even in the Duden.

    For those I have a US Army dictionary of military terms and abbreviations that covers most of them (thankfully most of the old WWI terms continued into WWII). For the truly old (my interests go back to the founding of the German Navy in 1848) I have to rely on a Franco-Prussian war military dictionary.
    Mike C.

    German Navy Small Arms 1848-1918
    Life member: NRA, OVMS, VGCA
    Member: NAPCA, N-SSA(Veteran)
    Si vis pacem, para bellum

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Berlin - P.04 Navy Lugers
    Posts
    2,617

    Default A Blast from the Past?

    The Polizei have closed off the area adjacent to my building.

    D1720D50-D52B-464D-9932-1867CEA72A92.jpeg

    As you can see, the roadblock is at the intersection where I live. I was sitting here doing homework when I heard a bunch of sirens. Shortly after that my phone started to blow up with texts from Andrea. They came closer and closer together until the last Schreib Mir!!
    It turns out workers uncovered a WWII bomb, so they evacuated the area and are defusing it. She heard about the bomb and was worried about my safety.
    Mike C.

    German Navy Small Arms 1848-1918
    Life member: NRA, OVMS, VGCA
    Member: NAPCA, N-SSA(Veteran)
    Si vis pacem, para bellum

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    North of Spokane, WA
    Posts
    12,992

    Default

    I would imagine it is less, but from what I've read, they still find bombs (I was in europe fro 93-99) and england would find them, but especially Germany, and the big 1,000 pounders and up cause a bit of consternation and every now and then one blows.

    I think they still blow some in place? Or are all evacuated now?

Page 1 of 10 12345 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •