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Thread: End of Luger production?

  1. #1
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    Default End of Luger production?

    When Luger production came to an end in ww2 , we’re there any commercial or other Luger’s produced with all the left over parts and if so a photo of an example would be very much appreciated.
    Thanks

  2. #2
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    Yes, up until 1948 by Mauser. And a small run in 1953 by VEB Ernst Thälmann in Suhl.

    But the Suhl ones were strictly government work. Mauser did cobble together non-government pistols.

    Co-Author 'The Parabellum Is Back! 1945-2000'.

  3. #3
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    Thanks for the comments and photos suppose to trade for one tomorrow, it has a 40 chamber date and commercial proofs from what I remember about it .

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    I believe Mauser assembled a smallish amount after the war during the French occupation of the plant in 1945 and early 1946.
    Ned

  5. #5
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    There are late war examples of Lugers that appear to be made up of left over parts. Sometimes they are called "Out of sequence" Lugers. Here are some Forum posts on the subject.
    https://luger.gunboards.com/showthre...light=sequence
    https://luger.gunboards.com/showthre...uence-1940-byf
    There are pictures of more of these on page 261 in the book The Mauser Parabellum.
    Tom

  6. #6
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    Thanks everyone will posts photos if I purchase it tomorrow.

  7. #7
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    A 1940 would not likely to have been made up of parts after the war by the factory.

    East Germany - sure
    Rebuild after the war by someone - sure

    But very unlikely after the war by Mauser or the French.

  8. #8
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    Ed, I disagree.

    Mauser didn't waste anything and there are quite a few examples of Mauser assembled guns from leftover parts, including foreign contract bits and pieces, even during the war.

    Mostly with 41 and 42 dated receivers, but I wouldn't rule out a 1940 one.

    But the 1940 pistol shown in the thread above was probably put together somewhere in an army repair facility. Mauser made assembled pistols received either normal WaA acceptance markings, commercial Eagle/N proofs or a combination. When the French took over, the French star proof appeared.

    Co-Author 'The Parabellum Is Back! 1945-2000'.

  9. #9
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    Vlim, I thought dating a receiver was one of the last steps, so unless it was returned for repair or there was an issue, why would there be DATED receivers in storage?

  10. #10
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    They dated them during manufacturing of the receivers. Thats why it is difficult to say exactly when a pistol was made. As the receivers made in the previous months would be used in the next year. Also, most parts had some degree of overproduction, for spares and to cover hickups and mistakes in production. They did not scrap 1940 receivers when 1941 came. Most likely they finished the batch, then went to 1941 marked bits. So there would have been an overrun of last year's receivers anyway.

    Add to that the pistols and parts that were rejected. Usually some things got rejected 'just because'. The acceptance officials usually reject things now and then just to show to their leaders they are in control and doing their job thoroughly.

    Remember also that by 1945 Mauser still even had parts from DWM lying around. Artillery barrels were never made by Mauser, they just used up the old stock from DWM which pretty much dated from before 1919.

    Co-Author 'The Parabellum Is Back! 1945-2000'.

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