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Thread: 37 date Luger

  1. #1
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    Default 37 date Luger

    I have a luger for 10 years that I got from a vets brother. The trigger and takedown lever does not match. Everything else is matching. I guess that it the way he brought it back or maybe he had it worked on later on, who knows. It came in a 1916 dated holster. One mag looks like the bottom may have been ground, there is no markings. There is a stenciling number on the side of the mag. The other mag looks like a repro that he must have picked up later. There is a takedown tool with numbers x'd out on one side and numbers on the other. Just had some time today so I thought I would post it and see what you guys think about it.

    Thanks, DELIMG_0434.jpgIMG_0441.jpgIMG_0438.jpgIMG_0437.jpgIMG_0442.jpgIMG_0443.jpgIMG_0444.jpgIMG_0427.jpgIMG_0450.jpgIMG_0433.jpgIMG_0429.jpgIMG_0418.jpgIMG_0419.jpgIMG_0420.jpgIMG_0421.jpgIMG_0422.jpgIMG_0423.jpgIMG_0424.jpgIMG_0426.jpgIMG_0451.jpg

  2. #2
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    Default 37 date luger

    Here are the pics of the holster.IMG_0446.jpgIMG_0447.jpgIMG_0449.jpg

  3. #3
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    Welcome to the forum

    Looks like a nice 1937 Mauser, that unfortunately has two mismatched parts, putting it essentially into the 'shooter' category ($600-$750)

    You can look for these two numbered parts, but its harder to do than you think.

    Is the firing pin slotted on the end, I know from an angle it will look rounded on the end, but that would not be correct for 1937

    Ed
    Edward Tinker
    ************
    Co-Author of Police Lugers
    Co-Author of Simson Lugers
    Author of Veteran Bring Backs Vol I -- Vol II and Vol III - a collection of stories on guns & equipment brought back by GI's.


  4. #4
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    Default 37 date luger

    Quote Originally Posted by Edward Tinker View Post
    Welcome to the forum

    Looks like a nice 1937 Mauser, that unfortunately has two mismatched parts, putting it essentially into the 'shooter' category ($600-$750)

    You can look for these two numbered parts, but its harder to do than you think.

    Is the firing pin slotted on the end, I know from an angle it will look rounded on the end, but that would not be correct for 1937

    Ed
    Ed, thanks for your reply. I don't recall the slot on the firing pin. I would have to take it apart again. It is stamped 01. You mentioned looking for the correct parts. I thought they had changed them because the parts that were there broke. How much do you think the holster is worth? What are your thoughts on the mags & tool? Is the tool a reissue?
    Del

  5. #5
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    Dec 2009
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    Mauser introduced firing pins with fluted relief slots cut in the face in order to provide pressure venting for situations where primer blow back occurred. Your 1937 firing pin should be slotted in this way... The unrelieved firing pin was used prior to Mauser back in WW-I and the Weimar periods.

    It was common for soldiers to de-activate pistols by discarding firing group parts like the trigger, firing pin and trigger plate/lever assembly prior to being captured. It's possible that is what happened to this pistol. The vet that captured it would have obtained replacement parts to bring it back to utility....

    You can check to see if your trigger plate matches by looking inside for a number related to the first two digits of your pistol's serial number. In a 1937, I believe you should find the same digits. On later pistols, the number +1.

    I've attached a picture of a fluted (slotted) firing pin.

    Marc
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Igitur si vis pacem, para bellum -
    - if you wish for peace, prepare for war.

  6. #6
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    Marc, thanks for your reply. I am a little confused. If the firing pin and side plate have the last 2 digits of the gun, wouldn't that make them issued pieces with the gun. The side plate doesn't look like it has been ground down and stamped 01 to match the rest of the gun. Do you mean that it has to be 01 on the front and back?
    Del

  7. #7
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    No... Inside a matching trigger plate, you'll find a number corresponding to the first two digits of your pistol's serial number. On Lugers of your vintage it should be the same as the first digits of your s/n. On later ones, it is the first two digits plus one.

    For example. If your pistol is serial 1234a your trigger side plate would have "34" stamped on the outside, and "12" on the inside (or "13" on the inside for later Mauser Lugers).

    Mauser used fluted firing pins. It's likely that someone found a "01" marked firing pin from an Imperial era Luger and replaced yours at some point.

    Marc
    Igitur si vis pacem, para bellum -
    - if you wish for peace, prepare for war.

  8. #8
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    The side plate looks like it's matching to me, the trigger and take down is what doesn't match.

    A '37 mauser side plate would be marked in the military (exposed) style with the last two showing would it not?
    "The only difference between us and the savages is the quality of our weapons"

  9. #9
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    Something about the firing pin looks suspect. It appears the forward ring on the firing pin has been ground down and tapered slightly.

    I believe the original intent of the milled grooves in the firing pin was to provide clearance for grease/crud build up to escape from the breechblock ahead of the firing pin. They would also allow gas to more easily escape, but once past the grooves, where would the gas go? With or without the grooves, you would probably have a wrecked pistol after a pierced primer.

    This is the side plate on a 1939 Code 42 pistol whose first two digits are 11. By this time the number in the side plate was one higher than the outside number.


  10. #10
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    Del, roll your pin on it's side and take another pic. It looks fluted to me, just pictured from the top. Take a pic of the inside of the side plate too. This should settle those questions. Why is the side plate suspect anyway?

    I really like that tool, not often you see them like that one.
    "The only difference between us and the savages is the quality of our weapons"

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