Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 35

Thread: About Glisenti M1910

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Salerno, Italia
    Posts
    2,498

    Default About Glisenti M1910

    I saw that someone complains about the lack of historical facts about the Glisenti Mod.1910, I know somethimgs and, if you like it, I want to tell them there.
    The designer was Bethel Abiel Revelli, a former artillery officer. The technical drawings of the gun was sold to the Company of Brescia "Glisenti". In 1907 the Glisenti sold the project to the "Metallurgica Bresciana Tempini", that was the only manufacturer of the Mod. 1910. The "Metallurgica Bresciana" was equipped with excellent machinery purchased by Ludwig Loewe of Berlin and Mr. Tempini was in contact with Paul Mauser and Georg Luger. For this reason, perhaps,the first model of the automatic pistol Glisenti was manufactured in caliber 7,65 with a bottle-shaped cartridge case identical to the 7.65 Parabellum (30 Luger), but with less powder charge. This cartridge was insufficient to military uses and the pistol, in fact, was refused in 1909 to an official announcement for a semiautomatic pistol.
    The caliber was changed in 9 mm. This last round was identical in shape to the cartridge 9 Parabellum caliber, but, again, with less powder charge.
    This calibre was accepted by Military and the weapon was adopted in the Italian Army in 1910 as “Pistola Automatica Modello 1910”.
    The total production of 1910 model was around 32,000 pieces. The entire supply was handed the Italian Army before World War I and the gun was the "baptism of fire" during the war of Libya, between the Kingdom of Italy and the Ottoman Empire, began September 28, 1911 and ending October 18, 1912.
    The lots of guns were 2,000 units each, always preceded by a letter. The letters go from “A” to “R”, without “J” e “K”, missing letters in the alphabet Italian.
    On the right side of the gun, above, is stamped the serial number of the weapon and, in a circle, C/Fab1910. “Fab” means “Fabbrica d’Armi di Brescia” (Weapons Factory – Brescia) and 1910 indicates the year of adoption of the weapon. Interestingly is the fact that on the first 5000 pistols, from A1 to C1000, circa, there is, in a circle “C/Fab 1909", rather “C/Fab1910”; this means an acquisition before the official adoption. This gun was very well manufactured. The magazine is a masterpiece of efficiency. If you seek its cartridges is very pleasant to shoot, very accurate and safe use.
    The materials used are excellent (less than the grips, which is ebonite), the workmanship is impeccable as for the Lugers.
    Pay attention, if you remove the firing pin, the sear is screwed with the thread counter-clockwise.
    Cari Amici, cordialissimi saluti
    Giuliano
    P.S. the second to last photo shows a cartridge cal 9 Glisenti dismantled and the last shows two packages of cartridges, cal 9 Glisenti always, distributed to the troops during I WW.
    Giuliano
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by giualfi; 02-15-2011 at 08:13 AM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Brazil (South America)
    Posts
    4,477

    Default

    Grazie per la lezione, professore!
    Nice presentation for a underappreciated handgun.
    Abraços,

    Douglas

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    New York, USA.
    Posts
    1,688

    Default

    I echo Douglas' sentiments!! A really nice presentation!!

    Dave

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    New Mexico, USA.
    Posts
    7,151

    Default

    Giuliano
    Excellent presentation! I have owned two Glisentis in my life, and I regret not being able to keep them (I needed trading material for Lugers!). They are well made and interesting guns. However, I never could find one that still had the "tool" under the left grip.
    If it is made after 1918...it is a reproduction.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Salerno, Italia
    Posts
    2,498

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Douglas_Jr View Post
    Grazie per la lezione, professore!
    Nice presentation for a underappreciated handgun.
    Abraços,

    Douglas
    Dear Douglas, obrigado pelo elogio!
    But I'm not a professor, I like only communicate what I know in the field that we are passionate. I hope to be helpful in describing this old lady.
    Yes, the Model 1910 is a weapon not appreciated by us in Italy also. Everything comes from the fact that people want to use the more powerful 9 Parabellum rather than the cartrige Glisenti cal 9.
    Dear Douglas, um abraço para você também !!
    Giuliano
    Last edited by giualfi; 02-02-2011 at 12:05 PM.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Salerno, Italia
    Posts
    2,498

    Default

    Dear Dave, thank you for your kind words.
    Dear Ron, it is possible that I have a tool. If you want, I can send it you as a gift.
    I'll tell you that it is a gift why another German member of Furum wrote to me to find out handbooks on Italian revolver Model 1874 and 1889. I answered that I knew nothing and that I could send a brochure on these revolvers, obviously as a gift.
    The man replied me no more ..... I have been very bad about it !!
    Guys, excuse me for having vented.
    Cordialissimi saluti a tutti
    Giuliano

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Salerno, Italia
    Posts
    2,498

    Default

    A consideration for Douglas: the Modello 1910 has been little appreciated for two main reasons: the very high cost and the low power of the cartridge caliber 9 Glisenti.
    The first reason has motif to be: the Modello 1910 was actually very expensive.
    The second absolutely not. In fact, this gun was replaced during I I World War by the pistols Beretta, Mod. 15, caliber 7.65 mm Browning and 9 Glisenti. The first cartrige was much less potent than the 9 Glisenti, which was also chambered for the Beretta.
    Other criticisms are completely unjustified.
    Cordialissimi saluti
    Giuliano

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    California, USA.
    Posts
    839

    Default

    Great information. I see you have the correct lanyard for the Glisenti M1910, it is only the second one I have ever seen. Are they common in Italy? I have a second Gllisenti M1910 and a Brixia that need one. The holsters are also uncommon. Thank you for sharing this information, these are very interesting and well made pistols.
    Dean

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Salerno, Italia
    Posts
    2,498

    Default

    Dear Dean, the lanyard is not common in Italy, indeed, it is rare. I have only this. It is in silk. In past years, holsters were relatively common, but now absolutely no.
    Cordialissimi saluti
    Giuliano

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    SW Florida
    Posts
    439

    Default

    Giuliano,
    Great pictures and presentation. Thank you for sharing, it is important when collecting firearms or anything. The forum gives us that opportunity. Again thanks and God bless. art.
    Giuliano,
    I just remembered what I was going to ask. Is the Glisenti and Brixia (my spelling may be wrong) magazines interchangeable? art

Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •