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Thread: 1937 S/42 Luger

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Reno NV
    Posts
    16

    Default 1937 S/42 Luger

    I recently picked this up and I have a few questions. It has all matching numbers throughout including the grip panels and magazine. Serial number is 4802x. It came with an original clamshell holster and extra non matching magazine and loading tool.













    While the condition is about right to use as a shooter, since it's an all matching gun I doubt seriously if it will ever get any range time as I don't want to risk breaking any parts on it.

    What I have a question about is the loading tool. While it looks to have finish wear commensurate with the age of the rest of the rig, there are no Waffenamts on it. Are there supposed to be? If so would they be the same as the rest of the gun i.e. eagle over 63?

    Also, as you can see in the picture, the spare magazine has a "+" on it does that mean it was a spare mag? If there is someone out there that has a gun serial number 785g that needs this mag, I would be happy to trade them for a similar condition magazine that would be correct for a 1937 S/42. Or, even more unlikely, if someone out there has the spare mag that came with this gun, I would just love to purchase it. I know it's not very likely, but who knows, maybe I'll get lucky.............

    Thanks in advance for any information.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Centennial/Colorado
    Posts
    876

    Default

    My references indicate that generally original Mauser tools had an acceptance mark, however I will defer to others as to the originality of your tool.

    The "+" mark indicates the second magazine issued to a military pistol.

    I own 1937 #3394x, same block but earlier production. It also has a matching magazine and has the SE 63 marking as yours does, which is correct for '37 x-block army pistols. The eagle on your magazine is referred to as a straight winged or stick winged eagle, abbreviated "SE". Your second magazine marked SE 83 was issued with some earlier 1937 pistols and then again with some 1938 pistols.

    From what I can see in the photos I view this pistol as collectible and agree with your decision not to shoot it. Congratulations on a fine example.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Location
    Port Saint Lucie,Florida
    Posts
    603

    Default

    Can't answer your question on the loading tool, but that's a real nice looking '37 S/42! Congrats on the acquisition!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Location
    Ohio, USA
    Posts
    221

    Default

    Nice '37 collector's Luger...I also would not recommend firing her, for fear of breakage...

    Nice example...congrats...

    I see you already added your Parabellum to the 1937/1938 Data Request Listing...

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Location
    Ohio, USA
    Posts
    221

    Default

    Nice '37 2nd variation...I would also recommend not shooting her, for fear of breakage...

    This is what "shooter" Lugers are for, if you want to take your Parabellum to the range...

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    NW Washington
    Posts
    572

    Default

    Your Luger is definitely not a shooter - has way too much finish left for that - and it has a matching mag to boot!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    NW Washington
    Posts
    572

    Default

    I'm going to guess this is your first Luger, so congrats on finding a nice original matching example. Your Luger is definitely not a shooter - can't see the gripstraps but it looks to have way too much original finish left to be called a shooter - and it has a matching mag to boot!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Reno NV
    Posts
    16

    Default

    Thanks for the responses. Actually this is technically my forth Luger. The first was many, many years ago and was a mismatched shooter grade gun, except that I could never get it to shoot reliably and in fit of frustration and disgust I traded it off for something else. Second was a 1913 dated DWM, all matching, but with some semi deep pitting at the muzzle and the front edge of the frame on the right side. That too went away in a trade on a near perfect '43 Ithaca 1911-A1.

    The story on this one is that I was at a gun show last weekend where had I picked up a decent 1918 Erfurt with a mismatched side plate for $800 which I was going to use as a shooter. But then I walked by a table and spotted this S/42 and I wound up trading the seller the Erfurt and $483 (all the money I had left) for it. So I figure I have $1283 in it. The pictures really don't do it justice as the only bluing wear is on the usual high points from where it contacted the holster and the front and rear grip straps. Bore is excellent and as I said in my OP, everything matches throughout.

    I have mostly concentrated on US Property handguns, specifically 1911's, for many years and have a decent collection of them. In the last few years I have been branching out to included Axis guns as correct original USGI automatics have gotten to be rather expensive. I have been fortunate enough to pick up a couple of very nice WWII P38 sets (ac44, byf44) with matching holsters and spare mags. I also found a very early Femaru Mod37 from the fist Luftwaffe contract. I just couldn't resist this set as I am a sucker for guns with the original holsters and I figure that I bought it for the right price.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Somewhere in Northern Italy
    Posts
    123

    Default

    Since I am not really a Luger expert I will have to let someone else chime in on that, BUT to me that is a very nice pistol, in excellent condition and if I were you I would never shoot it.
    Congrats.
    Sergio

    Anything with a FLGR is fluff, if JMB didn't put it on the 1911 you don't need it.
    If you are going to collect, don't be 'drawn' to an example that is not original, nor correct. Instant gratification is more expensive than a good education
    .

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    1,092

    Default

    Salt bluing is nowhere near as attractive as the rust bluing. It doesn't have the rich hue and deep luster. And it doesn't hold up as well to wear.

    But the gun itself is just as functional, and its historical significance is just the same.

    It might have a little more dulling and fading than its older salt blued sibling. But it is still plenty collectible. Much more than shooter grade, IMO

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